AMCIS 2005 Track on
Human-Computer Interaction Studies in MIS

 


General Description

(2/21/2005)

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary field that has attracted many researchers, educators, and practitioners from many different disciplines. HCI has gained even more attention during recent years in which technology has developed at a fast pace. To better utilize this advanced technology, we need to better understand users, their tasks within different contexts, and the interplay among users, tasks, and contexts/ environments.

In the MIS field, broad HCI issues and research questions have been investigated over a long period of time. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) or Human Factors studies in MIS are concerned with the ways humans interact with information, technologies, and tasks, especially in business, managerial, organizational, and cultural contexts. MIS researchers are interested in macro level analyses and issues, and they study these issues in the organizational/business contexts or take these contexts into consideration in their studies.

The high level of interest exhibited by MIS scholars in broad HCI studies has been demonstrated in many ways:

  1. High number of hits from queries to the ISWORLD Faculty Directory on research and teaching in HCI related areas (see Zhang et al., 2002 in CAIS);
  2. High level of participation in HCI specific events sponsored by the AIS SIGHCI (see Prior History section below for more details).
  3. High level of participation in HCI minitrack/track at AMCIS 2002, 2003, and 2004. During the past three AMCIS conferences, the HCI in MIS minitrack (which became the HCI in MIS track at AMCIS 2004) was among the most popular ones at AMCIS.

This increasing trend of interest and enthusiasm was exhibited by the large number of submissions and the high level of participation during the last few years. A meta/mega track is necessary so that (1) it is possible to attend to specific research areas within HCI in MIS, (2) more HCI researchers can be involved, play important organizing roles, and make an impact in this area, and (3) the overall reviewing process for this area can be more efficiently and better managed

The aim of this track is consistent with the HCI in MIS minitrack/track in previous AMCIS, which is to provide a forum for AIS members to acknowledge each other's work, and to discuss, develop, and promote a range of issues related to the history, reference disciplines, theories, practice, methodologies and techniques, new development, and applications of the interaction between humans, information and information technology. In an effort to bridge academic research and industry practice, both research articles and experience reports are welcome. The track is open to all types of research methodologies (e.g., conceptualization, theorization, case study, action research, experimentation, survey, simulation). We also welcome visionary articles and research in progress.


Special Issue of the International Journal of Human-Computer Studies Top of page arrow

(7/4/2005)

To continue the AIS SIGHCI tradition, we will have a special issue of a high quality refereed academic journal, International Journal of Human-Computer Studies (IJHCS), to publish the expansions of the best papers from the HCI track. We thank the co-editors-in-chief of IJHCS, E. Motta and S. Wiedenbeck, for accepting our proposal and for their strong support of the importance of HCI research in the MIS discipline. The guest editors for this special issue are Fiona Nah, Ping Zhang, Scott McCoy, & Mun Yi.

Best completed research papers from participating HCI mini-tracks will be considered for the special issue.

Tentative Timetable:
  • 7/1/05-7/8/05: Invitation sent out to authors
  • 8/31/05: 1st submission
  • 10/15/05: Notification of first review
  • 12/1/05: 2nd submission
  • 2/1/06: Final notification and acceptance decisions
  • 2/28/06: Final revision due

 

The HCI Track's 7 Mini-tracks Top of page arrow

[1. IT Systems Accessibility ] [2. HCI with Mobile Devices] [3. Information Visualization and Decision Support] [4. Emergency Response Information Systems]
[5. Human Computer Interaction Models and Issues in Information Seeking Engines] [6. Personalization Systems] [7. Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact]

(2/21/2005)
As a meta/mega track for the HCI in MIS area, we want to make sure that any research article that does not fit into a specific HCI minitrack can be accepted to the meta/mega track. If a paper submitted to the meta/mega track can be a better fit in a specific minitrack, we will move the paper to that minitrack.

To continue the SIGHCI tradition, a high quality refereed academic journal is being worked on for a possible special issue based on the expansions of the best papers from the meta/mega track. We will discuss the possibility of collaborating with interested HCI minitracks to jointly participate in this special issue. Of course, if a HCI minitrack has its own plans for connecting with a different journal, we respect that and will help out in any way we can.

Important Dates

DATE/DEADLINE

MILESTONE
February 1, 2005 Authors email abstracts to mini-track chairs.
February 1, 2005 Panel and Tutorial submissions due
March 1 Workshop submissions due
March 1, 2005 Authors create an account and UPLOAD (submit) papers to ONE AND ONLY ONE mini-track on the AIS Review System. Papers MAY NOT be submitted to more than one mini-track.
March 1-5, 2005 Mini-track chairs assign reviewers via the AIS Review System (this may require iteration if reviewers decline to accept assignments).
March 30, 2005 Reviewers enter final reviews into the AIS Review System
April 15, 2005 Mini-track chairs fill out decision reports in the AIS Review System, which automatically notifies authors via email.
May 6, 2005 Authors upload revised papers to AIS Review System.
May 15, 2005 Authors receive email notification of acceptance of revisions.
May 31, 2005 At least one author of each paper must register for the conference.
August 11-14 Attend AMCIS2005

 

CFP of HCI Mini-track 1 Back to Mini-Track

Human-Computer Interaction
(Sponsored by SIGHCI)

Information Technology Systems Accessibility

Minitrack Chairs
Eleanor Loiacono
Scott McCoy
Nicholas Romano

Description: Accessibility is the ability of persons, regardless of ability, to easily access information, regardless of form, structure, or presentation. Fifty-four million Americans—nearly one in five—live with some form of disability (cognitive, visual, or audio) that makes accessing information difficult. Though great strides have been made during the past decade to accommodate those with special needs (including the development of numerous assistive technologies), there is still much to be done. For example, as the Internet and World Wide Web become an integral component of daily life, Web accessibility becomes more vital.
Accessibility goes beyond making information available for people with disabilities. Increasing accessibility may in turn increase use of systems by users without disabilities as well. Those with less powerful computers or slow Internet connections may find it preferable to purchase from accessible-friendly websites that require less bandwidth. For example, some might find it beneficial to surf the Web with the graphics function turned off, thus decreasing download time. Given this broad definition of accessibility, a number of research perspectives are expected from such areas as Information Systems, Information Science, Library Science, Education, Computer Science, and Engineering.

Potential topics and research questions that this Mini-track would address includes but is not limited to:

- Accessibility
- Internet and Web Accessibility
- Assistive Technology
- Adaptive Technology
- Accessibility within Workforce
- Usability


Submission guidelines:
1. Submit abstracts via email to the co-chairs by February 1, 2005. This is an important step to ensure that you have submitted your paper to the correct mini-track.
2. Final papers will be submitted via the AIS Review System, deadline is March 1, 2005. See the conference website for details: http://amcis2005.isqa.unomaha.edu/.
3. Copyright Information: Submission of a paper to the conference represents the author's agreement to allow AIS to publish the paper in any written or electronic format for distribution to all interested parties in perpetuity with or without compensation to AIS and without compensation to the author. The parties understand that the author is granting a nonexclusive license and all copyrights remain the property of the author.

 

CFP of HCI Mini-track 2 Back to Mini-Track

Human-Computer Interaction
(Sponsored by SIGHCI)

HCI with Mobile Devices (co-sponsored by SIGEBIZ)

Minitrack Chairs
Peter Tarasewich
Fiona Nah



Mobile applications are having a profound impact on organizations and individuals. Organizations no longer need to provide every employee with a wired connection to perform their job functions. Individuals can use mobile devices to access the information systems they need anywhere at anytime. But mobility and mobile device use is also adding to problems of information overload. Information management becomes more difficult and complex in mobile environments as well. Since mobile devices can be taken anywhere, the user’s environment can change rapidly from moment to moment. There can also be a significant number of people, objects, and activities vying for a user’s attention aside from the mobile application itself.

Designing effective interaction methods is a challenging part of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), and mobile devices make this challenge even greater. Mobile applications require efficient ways to record and access information under circumstances that are often quite different from those where desktop computers are used. The purpose of this mini-track is to provide a forum for examining how people interact with mobile information systems and the devices that are used to access them. Submissions describing original research or case studies related to all information systems aspects of HCI with mobile devices are welcome.

Possible Topics include, but are not limited to the following:


  • Interface design for mobile devices
  • Usability testing methods for wireless applications
  • Securing mobile devices and interactions
  • Field tests of mobile information systems
  • Designing privacy into mobile applications
  • Notification cues or displays for wearable devices
  • Wearable systems and computing
  • Input and output methods for ultra-mobile devices (e.g., watches, rings)


Please contact the Chairs with any questions concerning the suitability of topics for this mini-track. Potential authors are also encouraged to look at the other related mini-tracks sponsored by both SIG HCI and SIGeBIZ at AMCIS 2005.

 

CFP of HCI Mini-track 3 Back to Mini-Track

Decision Support, Knowledge and Data Management
(Sponsored by SIGHCI)

Information Visualization and Decision Support (co-sponsored by SIGDSS)

Minitrack Chairs
David Schuff
Ozgur Turetken

The abundance of information available to today’s managers makes it essential to efficiently represent, filter, and present information for effective decision making. The rapid advances in hardware and software development have made it possible to present data visually from multiple perspectives. However, the challenge is the design of visualizations such that (1) they are useful in presenting non-numeric as well numeric information, and (2) they are integrated with other components of existing decision support systems.

From that perspective, the topic of information visualization spans several disciplines, including decision support and human-computer interaction. Specifically, the graphical presentation of information applies to an array of topics such as data modeling, interface design, data mining, and data warehousing. This mini-track will focus on the design, development, and use of information visualization, as well as its ability to function as a tool to aid managerial decision-making.

List of Possible Topics

• Techniques for the organization of information (e.g., clustering)
• Visual presentation of data mining results
• Design of visual interfaces that facilitate decision support
• Evaluation of visual interfaces especially from a decision effectiveness perspective
• Application of animation techniques to the presentation of information

For more information, please visit:

http://mis.temple.edu/sigdss/amcis05iv

 

CFP of HCI Mini-track 4 Back to Mini-Track

Decision Support, Knowledge and Data Management
(Sponsored by SIGHCI)

Emergency Response Systems (co-sponsored by SIGDSS)

Minitrack Chairs
Murray Turoff
Bartel Van de Walle

Any aspect of the design, development, deployment, operation, or evaluation of emergency response systems are appropriate for this mini-track provided it focuses on the tools, functionality, and/or interface the system provides to human users involved with emergency and crisis response. Also papers that focus on requirements for this environment and/or the impact or relationship of such systems to the behavior of the individuals or organizations involved are equally welcome.

Papers that focus on the underlying technology or hardware of computers, networks, sensors, mobile devices and their improvements in such areas as throughput, accuracy, and security, should be directed to other appropriate sessions. An exception might be any special purpose input/output device for use by respondents to a crisis situation.

This mini-track is concerned with the functionality that Emergency Response Information System provides for those involved in:

- Training for a crisis situation
- Planning for the response to a crisis situation
- Responding to a crisis situation
- Evaluating the performance during and after the crises

 

CFP of HCI Mini-track 5 Back to Mini-Track

Human-Computer Interaction
(Sponsored by SIGHCI)

Human Computer Interaction Models and Issues in Information Seeking Engines (co-sponsored by SIGSEMIS)

Minitrack Chairs
Rick Downing
Joi Moore

Description:
For information seeking to be effective, it should perhaps be conceptualized as a problem solving process, rather than a search for key terms. In order to address the problem solving characteristics of information seeking, the user interface in the electronic information seeking environment should provide methods for conducting natural language conversations between the user and the system. Information problems should be addressed incrementally with the system providing feedback designed to help the user narrow or broaden the scope of their search or increase domain knowledge regarding the topic of their search. In this way, the user can incrementally enhance their understanding of both the problem and potential solutions. Thus, search engines of the future should conduct an interactive conversation with the information seeker while incrementally narrowing the search with each conversational exchange and providing an incrementally finer description of the type of information sought prior to beginning the search.

Email spam can be greatly reduced through the use of Bayesian spam filters. These innovative agents learn from both spam email and acceptable email assigning scores to various aspects of the content of each message and determine whether to reject an email message based upon the overall score. Great progress has also been made in the use of both semantic web designs and ontologies. Perhaps it is time to reverse the paradigm from one in which humans query the system to one in which the system queries humans.

Relevance for MIS:
The development of intelligent information seeking engines has broad implications for library information systems, knowledge management systems, database systems used in support of decision support and data mining, as well as for general use in Internet searching.

We are seeking original research that develops, tests, advances, or applies theory, research, and knowledge to all areas of intelligent information seeking technology. Articles with both strong theoretical foundations and significant practical implications are highly encouraged.

Conceptual models, literature reviews, exploratory research, descriptive surveys, methodological studies, applied research, and replications or extensions of past research are of interest if they make an important contribution to human problem solving, intelligent agent, or AI theory, research, or knowledge, and provide insight for academic application or business practice. All types of rigorous methods (quantitative, qualitative, or combination) are acceptable.

Suggested Topics:Some suggested topics are listed below. Questions regarding the suitability of your topic should be addressed to the mini-track chairs.

• human problem solving processes
• intelligent search agents
• artificial intelligence and information seeking
• ontologies and information seeking
• innovative uses of Bayesian filters
• cognitive processes (or constraints) in information seeking
• interactive user interfaces
• semantic web engines
• natural language filters

Submission guidelines:
1. Submit abstracts via email to the co-chairs by February 1, 2005. This is an important step to ensure that you have submitted your paper to the correct mini-track.

2. Papers will be submitted via the AIS Review System, deadline is March 1, 2005. See the conference website for details.

3. Copyright Information: Submission of a paper to the conference represents the author's agreement to allow AIS to publish the paper in any written or electronic format for distribution to all interested parties in perpetuity with or without compensation to AIS and without compensation to the author. The parties understand that the author is granting a nonexclusive license and all copyrights remain the property of the author.

 

CFP of HCI Mini-track 6 Back to Mini-Track

Human-Computer Interaction
(Sponsored by SIGHCI)

Personalization Systems

Minitrack Chairs
Il Im

Personalization is one of the new phenomena that the Internet has brought to reality from imagination. As personalized services and products are becoming more common on the Internet, the interest on personalization is growing. Many practitioners and researchers are investigating into various issues of personalization. Yet, there is a lot to be known about personalization technologies and their impacts.

Through this minitrack, we aim to examine technologies for personalization, the impacts of personalization, and better ways for personalizing products and services. We welcome empirical research through quantitative or qualitative methodologies including novel conceptualizations of information systems, analytical modeling approaches, case studies of implementations and experimental or prototyping-based studies.

The following topics are indicative of the areas that are of particular interest:

- Personalization technologies such as recommendation systems and intelligent software
- Theories and models for better understanding of personalization
- Applications of personalization technologies
- Impact of personalization systems on users’ behavior
- The impacts of personalization systems on business
- Identifying and implementing users’ various personalization needs
- Best practices of personalization
- Cross-cultural issues of personalization
- Metrics for personalization success

 

CFP of HCI Mini-track 7 Back to Mini-Track

Human-Computer Interaction
(Sponsored by SIGHCI)


Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact

Minitrack Chairs
Scott McCoy
Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah
Mun Yi


This minitrack accepts HCI papers that do not fall into any of the following minitracks under the HCI track:

1. Information Technology Systems Accessibility;
2. Personalization Systems;
3. HCI with Mobile Devices (co-sponsored by SIGEBIZ);
4. Human Computer Interaction Models and Issues in Information Seeking Engines (co-sponsored by SIGSEMIS);
5. Emergency Response Systems (co-sponsored by SIGDSS);
6. Information Visualization and Decision Support (co-sponsored by SIGDSS).

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

• The behavioral, cognitive, and motivational aspects of human/computer interaction
• The analysis, design, development, evaluation, and use of information systems
• User interface design and evaluation of the Web for
- B2B, B2C, C2C E-Commerce
- Group collaboration
- Negotiation and auction
• The impact of interfaces/information technology on attitudes, behavior, performance, perception, and productivity
• Design, evaluation, and impact issues for small screen devices and M-Commerce
• User task analysis and modeling
• Information system usability engineering
• Guidelines and standards for interface design
• Interface issues in the development of other new interaction technologies
• Implications and consequences of technological change on individuals, groups, society, and socio-technical units
• Issues related to the elderly, the young and special needs populations
• Issues in teaching HCI courses
• Other human factors issues related to HCI

Call for Papers (2/21/2005) Top of page arrow

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary field that has attracted many researchers, educators, and practitioners from many different disciplines. HCI has gained even more attention during recent years in which technology has developed at a fast pace. To better utilize this advanced technology, we need to better understand users, their tasks within different contexts, and the interplay among users, tasks, and contexts/environments.

Despite broad interest in HCI from a variety of disciplines, we believe that there are unique HCI perspectives, considerations and issues that have not received much attention by other associations or disciplines, but are of great interest to or have been studied by, Information Systems researchers and teachers. A query of the ISWORLD Faculty Directory reveals that IS scholars have a broad research and teaching interest in HCI. In addition, research papers addressing pertinent HCI issues in an IS context have been spread out in many different tracks, mini-tracks, and conference sessions of several major IS conferences (AMCIS, HICSS and ICIS) in recent years. There have been a large number of shared concerns between MIS and HCI researchers.

The aim of this mini-track is to provide a forum to discuss these shared concerns. Specifically, the mini-track will provide an opportunity for AIS members to acknowledge each other's work, and to discuss, develop, and promote a range of issues related to the history, reference disciplines, theories, practice, methodologies and techniques, new development, and applications of the interaction between humans, tasks, information technologies, and contexts (organizational, cultural, etc.). In an effort to bridge academic research and industry practice, both research articles and experience reports are welcome. The mini-track is open to all types of research methodologies (e.g., conceptualization, theorization, case study, action and interpretive research, experimentation, survey, and simulation). We also welcome visionary articles and research in progress.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The behavioral, cognitive, motivational, and affective aspects of human/computer interaction
  • User task analysis and modeling; fit between navigation scheme and task types
  • Digital documents/genres and human information seeking behavior
  • User interface design and evaluation of the Web for
    • B2B, B2C, C2C E-Commerce
    • E-marketplace and supply chain management
    • Group collaboration
    • Negotiation and auction
    • Enterprise systems
    • Intranets
    • Extranets
  • Integrated and/or innovative approaches, guidelines, and standards for analysis, design, and development of interactive devices and systems,
  • Design of computer interfaces for single-user or collaborative decision support, including design of standard computer interfaces, as well as design for small-screen mobile devices and pervasive computing
  • Development and applications of multi-dimensional information visualizations
  • Usability engineering; metrics and methods for user interface assessment and evaluation
  • Usability studies for end-user computing in work or non-work environment, especially in the Internet era
  • Information technology acceptance and diffusion issues from cognitive, motivational, cultural, and user interface design perspectives
  • The impact of interfaces/information technology on attitudes, behavior, performance, perception, and productivity
  • Issues in software learning and training, including perceptual, cognitive, and motivational aspects of learning
  • Gender and technology
  • Issues related to the elderly, the young and special needs populations
  • Issues in teaching HCI courses
  • Other human factors issues related to HCI

Note: Completed research papers with high quality, especially those that emphasize shared concerns between MIS and HCI, will be considered (with revision and expansion) for a possible special issue with a leading refereed academic journal.

Submission Format: Please visit Official guideline

Deadline: The deadline for submitting papers is 11:59pm March 1st, 2005. See AMCIS'05 Call for Paper for more details.

How to submit papers: All submissions are through the electronic submission and review system managed by AIS. Please visit AMCIS'05 Submission Guideline for more details.


Instructions for Reviewers Top of page arrow

Reviewers play an important roles in the quality control process. We strongly suggest interested people to get involved in the review process.

To review for a specific minitrack, please send an email to the mini-track chairs indicating your area(s) of research expertise/interest and the maximum number of papers you are willing to review for that mini-track.  In addition, be sure to sign up as a reviewer on the AMCIS'05 review system that is available at: http://reviews.aisnet.org/amcis2005/.  Please follow the steps below to register as a reviewer for the mini-track on the AMCIS'05 review system:
1. Open the AMCIS 2005 Document Review System (DRS) at http://reviews.aisnet.org/amcis2005/
2. Click on the "Register Account" link in the "Sign In" menu on the left side of the page.
3. Fill in the required fields appearing on the "AMCIS 2005 Omaha – Create an Account" screen.
4. Click the "Sign Up" button to create your account.  Your initial password will be sent to you via e-mail.
5. Once you receive the e-mail with your password, log into your account.
6. Click on the "View/Edit Profile" in the "Logged In Menu".
7. Check the box next to "Reviewer" and select the mini-track name/title.
8. Click on "Update Profile" to save your changes.


Conference Sessions Top of page arrow

Room: CC 10

FrAM1

9:30 - 11:00am

SIGHCI01

HCI with Mobile Devices (Co-Sponsored by SIGEBIZ)

Andrew Chen, Arizona State University


"An Agent-Enabled System for Personalizing Wireless Mobile Services"
Qusay H. Mahmoud, University of Guelph
Zhixin Wang, University of Guelph


"Interface Design for Mobile Applications"
Boonlit Adipat, University of Maryland Baltimore County
Dongsong Zhang, University of Maryland Baltimore County


"Technology Overload: Is there a Technological Panacea?"
Sukeshini A. Grandhi, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Quentin Jones, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Starr Roxanne Hiltz, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Room: CC 10

FrAM2

11:30am - 1:00pm

SIGHCI02

HCI Models & Issues in Information Seeking Engines (Co-Sponsored by SIGSEMIS)

Chair: Ricard E Downing, Rockhurst University


"Exploring Individual User Attitudes Towards Performance with Web Search Engines: An Extension Study"
Allison Morgan, Pennsylvania State University
Bernard J. Jansen, Pennsylvania State University
Eileen Trauth, Pennsylvania State University


"One week with a corporate search engine: A time-based analysis of intranet information seeking"
Dick Stenmark, Institutionen för informatik

"Searching for Non-English Web Content: An Empirical Study of the Spanish Business Intelligence Portal"
Wingyan Chung, The University of Texas at El Paso
Room: CC 7

FrAM1

9:30 - 11:00am

SIGDSS08

Emergency Response Systems (Co-Sponsored by SIGDSS)

Chair: Murray Turoff, NJIT


"EVResponse - Moving Beyond Traditional Emergency Response Notification"
Manoj A. Thomas, Virginia Commonwealth University
Francis K. Andoh, Virginia Commonwealth University
Shilpa George, Intelligent Decision Systems Inc.


"Notifying Civilians in Time-Disaster Warning Systems Based on a Multilaterally Secure, Economic, and Mobile Infrastructu"
Tobias Scherner, Chair of mobile commerce, University of Frankfurt
Lothar Fritsch, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Frankfurt


"Unleash Physical Limitations: Virtual Emergency Preparedness Simulation Training, Methodology and a Case Study"
Xiang Yao, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Joseph A. Konopka, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Arthur H. Hendela, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Michael Chumer, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Murray Turoff, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Room: CC 7

FrAM2

11:30am - 1:00pm

SIGDSS06

Information Visualization & Decision Support (Co-Sponsored by SIGDSS)

Chair: Ozgur Turetken, Temple University


"Visualization and Bayesian Inference"
Vince Kellen, DePaul University

"Data Visualization Using Figural Animation"
Kurt A. Pflughoeft, Market Probe
Fatemeh "Mariam" Zahedi, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Ehsan Soofi, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee


"An Experimental Study of the Effects of Representational Data Quality on Decision Performance"
Wonjin Jung, Claremont Graduate University
Lorne Olfman, Claremont Graduate University
Terry Ryan, Claremont Graduate University
Yong-Tae Park, California State University, Fullerton
Room: CC 10

FrPM1

2:30 - 4:00pm

SIGHCI03

Information Technology Systems Accessibility

Chair: Eleanor T Loiacono, WPI


"Emotive captioning and access to television"
D.I. Fels, Ryerson University
C. J. Branje, Ryerson University
M. Hornburg, Marblemedia


"User Error Handling Strategies on a Non-Visual Multimodal Interface: Preliminary Results from an Exploratory Study"
Xiaoyu Chen, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Marilyn Mantei Tremaine, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Room: CC 10

FrPM2

4:30 - 6:00pm

SIGHCI04-1

Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact

Chair: Fiona Nah, University of Nebraska-Lincoln


"Website Intelligence: Conceptual Development and Empirical Assessment"
Khawaja Saeed, Wichita State University
Mun Yi, University of South Carolina
Insoo Hwang, Jeonju University


"Assessing the Reliability, Validity and Adaptability of PSSUQ"
Ann Fruhling, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Sang M Lee, University of Nebraska at Lincoln


"Relative importance of web quality dimensions"
Ravi C Seethamraju, University of Sydney
Room: CC 10

SaAM1

9:30 - 11:00am

SIGHCI04-2

Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact

Chair: Mun Yi, University of South Carolina


"Capacity Decisions at E-commerce Sites: A Competitive Analysis"
Dengpan Liu, School of Management,University of Texas at Dallas
Subodha Kumar, School of Business,University of Washington
Vijay Mookerjee, School of Management,University of Texas at Dallas


"A Dual-Modal Presentation of Network Relationships in Texts"
Jacek Brzezinski, DePaul University
Shuang Xu, DePaul University
Susy Chan, DePaul University
Xiaowen Fang, DePaul University


"Information Search Patterns on Product Comparison Services in E-Commerce Websites"
Hong-Hee Lee, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Liqiang Chen, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Room: CC 10

SaAM2

11:30am - 1:00pm

SIGHCI04-3

Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact

Chair: Richard Johnson, University of Central Florida


"Online Mood Induction"
Eleanor T. Loiacono, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Nolan J. Taylor, University of Indiana
Soussan Djamasbi, Worcester Polytechnic Institute


"A Research Agenda toward Assessing Perceived Affective Quality of IT"
Na Li, Syracuse University
Ping Zhang, Syracuse University


"A Look at How Levels of Vividness and Social Presence Affect Trust in a Decision Aid"
Damon E. Campbell, Washington State University
Mark A. Fuller, Washington State University
Traci J. Hess, Washington State University


Room: CC 10

SaPM1

2:30 - 4:00pm

SIGHCI04-4

Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact

Chair: John Wells, Washington State University


"Promoting Consumption Information Contribution to Online Feedback Systems: An Analysis from the Cognition Enhancement Pe"
Xinwei Wang, National University of Singapore
Hock-Hai Teo, National University of Singapore
Kwok-Kee Wei, City University of HongKong


"Attribution and Computer Self-Efficacy Transfer in Software Skill Acquisition"
Yuzhu Li, University of Central Florida
Richard Johnson, University of Central Florida


"Collaborative indexing as a framework for search and knowledge management"
John M Owens, Virginia Commonwealth University

Room: CC 10

SaPM2

4:30 - 6:00pm

SIGHCI04-5

Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact

Chair: Traci Hess, Washington State University


"Measuring Online Trust of Websites: Credibility, Perceived Ease of Use, and Risk"
Cynthia L. Corritore, Creighton University
Robert P. Marble, Creighton University
Susan Wiedenbeck, Drexel University
Beverly Kracher, Creighton University
Ashwin Chandran, Essential Products, Inc.


"Antecedents of Customer Loyalty in the Online Shopping Environment"
Mujtaba Ahsan, UW - Milwaukee
Fatemah "Mariam" Zahedi, UW-Milwaukee
Room: CC 10

SuAM1

9:30 - 11:00am

SIGHCI04-6

Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact

Chair: Andrea Everard, University of Delaware


"Analysis of User Acceptance for Web-based Aptitude Tests with DART"
Michael Amberg, University Erlangen-Nuremberg
Sonja Fischer, University Erlangen-Nuremberg
Manuela Schröder, University Erlangen-Nuremberg


"Cultural Aspects for Technology Acceptance:Asian Perspectives and Research Techniques"
Jane Carey, Arizona State University West

"Examining Multiple Dimensions of Task-Technology Fit"
Mark Dishaw, Univ. of Wisconsin - Oshkosh
Diane Strong, Worcester Polytechnic Institute


Room: CC 10

SuAM2

10:30am - 12:00pm

SIGHCI04-7

Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact

Chair: Ping Zhang, Syracuse University


"Conceptual Evaluation of Weblog as a Computer-Mediated Communication Application"
Chuan-Hoo Tan, National University of Singapore
Suparna Goswami, National University of Singapore
YingQin Zhong, National University of Singapore
Yee-Pia Chan, National University of Singapore


"Online Decision-Making in VR Application Environments"
Y. Ken Wang, Washington State University
Pratim Datta, Washington State University


"Two Sides of the Story: Media Choice and Media Use of Web-based E-mail and Live Chat Customer Services"
Shu Zou, Temple University
Sam Stormont, Pennsylvania State University - Abington
Room: CC 7

SaAM1

9:30 - 11:00am

SIGHCI05

Personalization Systems

Chair: Il Im, Yonsei University


"Application of Nonparametric Techniques to Collaborative Recommender Systems"
Barbara D. Broome, University of Maryland Baltimore County
Malcolm S. Taylor, US Army Research Laboratory (Ret.)
Victoria Y. Yoon, University of Maryland Baltimore County


"Personalization of Web Services: A Study on the Fit between Web Tasks and Personalization Mechanisms"
Fiona Fui-Hoon Fui-Hoon, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Keng Siau, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Min Ling, University of Nebraska-Lincoln


"The Influence of Effort, Accuracy, and Emotions on Product Choice-Strategies: Evaluations of Recommendation Agents"
Young Eun Lee, University of British Columbia
Izak Benbasat, University of British Columbia

 

Track Co-Chairs Top of page arrow

Dr. Scott McCoy
College of William and Mary
School of Business
Williamsburg, VA
Phone: (757) 221-2062
Fax: (757) 221-2937
scott.mccoy@business.wm.edu
Dr. Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
College of Business Administration
Lincoln, NE 68588-0491
Phone: (402) 472-6060
Fax: (402) 472-5855
fnah@unl.edu
Dr. Mun Yi
University of South Carolina
Moore School of Business
Columbia, SC 29208
Phone: (803) 777-4351
Fax: (803) 777-6876
myi@moore.sc.edu

 

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